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Vol. 28 No. 2
March-April 2006

Making an imPACt | Recent IUPAC technical reports and recommendations that affect the many fields of pure and applied chemistry.
See also www.iupac.org/publications/pac

Supramolecular Assemblies With DNA (Special Topic Article)

Philippe Barthélémy, Stephen J. Lee, and Mark Grinstaff
Pure and Applied Chemistry
Vol. 77, No. 12, pp. 2133–2148 (2005)
doi:10.1351/pac200577122133

Information storage in chemical and biological systems involves recognition processes occurring at the molecular and macromolecular level. The implementation of a “code” can consist of multiple noncovalent interactions that include hydrogen bonds, π-stacking, hydrophobic interactions, and appropriate molecular and supramolecular architectures.

Examples of supramolecular assemblies formed
by nucleolipids. See PAC article for details.
Courtesy of P. Barthélémy, Université de Bordeaux, France.

With the double-helical DNA structure stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bond base-pairing and aryl π–π stacking interactions, nature provides to scientists an example of one of the most sophisticated supramolecular systems. Molecular organization using these types of processes has become a very powerful strategy for the construction of well-defined nanostructures. Self assemblies using noncovalent interactions have been designed to build fibers, membranes, two-dimensional monolayers, hydro, and organo gels, for example.

This article highlights the research presented at the DNA Supramolecular Assemblies workshop held in Avignon, France, on 5–6 May 2004. It first focuses on the recent progress achieved in the design of supramolecular self-assemblies that mimic the molecular recognition functionalities found with nucleic acids. It next presents several synthetic-DNA supramolecular assemblies currently developed to transport nucleic acids into cells. The marriage of supramolecular chemistry with nucleic acids as illustrated through examples opens new avenues for designing artificial molecular devices and expand the current repertoire of supramolecular assemblies available.

www.iupac.org/publications/pac/2005/7712/7712x2133.html


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