Chemistry International Blank Image
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Chemistry International Blank Image Chemistry International Blank Image Chemistry International Blank Image
Chemistry International Blank Image
Chemistry International Blank Image
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Current Issue
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Past Issues
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Officer's Columns
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Features
Chemistry International Blank Image
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Up for Discussion
Chemistry International Text Image Link to IUPAC Wire
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Project Place
Chemistry International Text Image Link to imPACt
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Bookworm
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Internet Connections
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Conference Call
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Where 2B and Y
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Symposia
Chemistry International Text Image Link to CI Indexes
Chemistry International Text Image Link to CI Editor
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Search Function
Chemistry International Text Image Link to Information

 

Chemistry International Text Image Link to Previous Issue Chemistry International Text Image Link to Previous Page Chemistry International Text Image Link to This TOC Chemistry International Text Image Link to Next Page Chemistry International Text Image Link to Next Issue

Vol. 27 No. 4
July-August 2005

From the Editor

If you were to visit the IUPAC Secretariat and walk down the hallway, you would see 85 years of the Union history: portraits of all the presidents who served the Union since 1919. The very first president, a French gentleman, Charles Moreau, is portrayed in a most formal suit and with the seriousness of the 1920s. Overall, about 30 portraits are lined up, with each subject displaying a facial expression that was a sign of their time. All the photos, even the most recent ones, are black and white, and all portray men who chose to carry out the mission of the Union.

image of Fabienne Meyers

Then there is another series of frames that portray the succession of division presidents. Probably no less than 100 photos, post-card size, are displayed. The second frame has something different . . . and here it is, the first woman division president: Mary Good, who served as president of the Inorganic Chemistry Division from 1981 to 1985. She also later served as an elected member of the Bureau and the Executive Committee. Good has been first in a number of other ways. She was the first woman to serve on the U.S. National Science Board after being appointed by Presidents Carter and Reagan. In 1997, Good became the first woman to receive the Priestley Medal, the highest honor given by the American Chemical Society.

As one glances at the other frames, only one more occurrence of a woman division president can be found: Irina Beletskaya served as president of the Organic Chemistry Division from 1989 to 1991. Beletskaya graduated from Moscow State University and has served there her entire career. Since 1992, she has been a full member of the Russian Academy of Science.

These portraits are simply a reflection of our history, and here is not the place to debate gender representation in the organization. However, if you are tickled by signs of change, look no further than page 17 in this issue. For the first time in IUPAC history, no less than four women appear on the election ballot for the IUPAC Bureau, including two for the position of vice president. As I have come to grasp, changes in IUPAC usually happen slowly; but when they do, they do for sure. As the baton is passed to younger scientists, we should hope that the issue of gender will never take precedence over one’s expertise and willingness to work as a volunteer for an organization such as IUPAC.

Fabienne Meyers
fabienne@iupac.org
www.iupac.org/publications/ci


Page last modified 17 June 2005.
Copyright © 2003-2005 International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.
Questions regarding the website, please contact edit.ci@iupac.org
Link to CI Home Page Link to IUPAC E-News Link to IUPAC Home Page