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Vol. 26 No. 3
May-June 2004

Making an imPACt | Recent IUPAC technical reports and recommendations that affect the many fields of pure and applied chemistry.
See also www.iupac.org/publications/pac

Terminology for Analytical Capillary Electromigration Techniques (IUPAC Recommendations 2003)

Marja-Liisa Riekkola, Jan Åke Jönsson, and Roger M. Smith

Pure and Applied Chemistry
Vol. 76, No. 2, pp. 443–451 (2004)

Capillary electromigration techniques are popular and important in chemical analysis, especially in the bioanalytical field. Some of the related terminology has been discussed in a paper on the terminology of electrophoresis in clinical chemistry, but in many cases this is not applicable to capillary techniques and does not fully take into account existing IUPAC definitions. Earlier work on the terminology of electroseparation techniques was not harmonized with the IUPAC nomenclature of chromatography. This paper discusses and defines the relevant terms needed in current practice, including names of the various techniques using electromigration principles.

The separations in capillary electromigration techniques are achieved in narrow capillaries by employing a high electric field strength. These techniques include capillary electrophoretic techniques and electrically driven capillary chromatographic techniques, based on different separation principles. In some cases, these principles overlap. Capillary electrophoretic techniques have proved to be highly effective for the separation of small organic and inorganic ions, pharmaceuticals, explosives, dyes, polymers, proteins and peptides, DNA and RNA, cells, particles, etc. The presence of electroosmotic flow may contribute to separation even though it is not always needed (e.g., in isoelectric focusing), or may even be completely undesired.

www.iupac.org/publications/pac/2004/7602/7602x0443.html


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