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Vol. 25 No. 3
May - June 2003

Bookworm | Books and publications hot off the press.
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Applications of Multiple Intelligences Theory to Chemistry Teaching and Learning

Boo Hong Kwen
Chemical Education International,
Vol. 3, AN-6, October 2002

There are two general views of intelligence–a view of intelligence as a trait, a more or less stable or "fixed" entity, or a view of intelligence as a quality that grows. Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences is an example of the latter view of intelligence. This multiple intelligences theory (MIT) was developed "as a contribution of psychology and, most especially, as a counterweight to the predominant notion of a single intelligence, that is putatively measured adequately by a single short answer instrument." MIT assumes that intelligence is not a single fixed entity but is dynamic and multifaceted. It assumes each intelligence can be cultivated. It also assumes that all students have available, for stimulation, the entire array of human intelligences. This paper discusses the issues, implications, and applications of MIT in the context of chemistry teaching and learning.

www.iupac.org/publications/
cei/vol3/0301x0an6.html


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